Ask most Americans where food comes from and they'll say the grocery store. True, but where did the grocery store get its food? The vast majority of America's food and fiber is grown on 125,000 farms across the country. With that few people standing in between feast and famine, America cannot afford to lose even one working farm.

It was the summer of 1996, in his mother's kitchen in Wisconsin, when Josh Schonwald had the most important salad of his life. It was fresh and filling—everything a salad should be. And yet, it was unlike anything he had ever eaten. It wasn't iceberg or romaine. The lettuce in this salad was a mix of greens that resembled weeds—arugula, baby spinach, red leaf, and green oak leaf—and had a mix of flavors and textures.
[Read the Full Article]

Hot dogs compared to cigarettes, sugar compared to cocaine, lean beef referred to as "pink slime." We can't be the only ones who have noticed that certain food-related stories seem to be a little dramatic of late. Exaggeration in the media isn't exactly new, but seems poorly timed considering the uncertain state of the Farm Bill, the impending task of feeding 9 billion people in less than 40 years and the fact that our nation's economic recovery—which is tied to our agricultural production—hangs in the balance.
[Read the Full Article]

You may have noticed that, despite your increased efforts make every less dollar count, your recent grocery bills aren't getting any smaller. Why is that you might ask? With the rising cost of oil and the extreme weather patterns that have left farm communities ravaged, it appears high food prices are here to stay. But, who's really profiting from these increased prices? If not the consumers, it must be the farmers, right? Wrong!
[Read the Full Article]

The idea behind the making of the list, according to Colman Andrews, editorial director of TheDailyMeal, was to choose people who "directly—or have the ability to directly—affect what and how we eat."
[Read the Full Article]

Many of us begin the day with a similar routine. We walk into a coffee shop and fork over 2 bucks for a little pick-me-up. "You want sugar and cream with that?" the barista asks. Apparently, how you answer that question is of no consequence to the coffee house's bottom line based on a profit breakdown recently released by the Specialty Coffee Association of America.
[Read the Full Article]

More and more people across the country are embracing a movement that is bridging the gap between the farm and the table. On the heels of an increasing nationwide awareness regarding health and nutrition, consumers’ desire to reconnect with their food has taken hold.
[Read the Full Article]

Farmers and consumers have a lot in common: neither benefit from higher grocery prices. The National Farmers Union recently released its Farmer's Share (of the grocery tab) data for the month of September, and once again, farmers came out on the losing end-even with higher than normal commodity prices.
[Read the Full Article]

Last week, tourists and congressional staffers walking down Independence Avenue near the U.S. Capitol building were treated to an unusual site: a wheat field growing smack in the middle of downtown Washington, DC.
[Read the Full Article]

For those of us who can remember when 100 Grand Bars cost 50 cents, the 2008 price probably seems steep (especially when you realize that candy bar sizes have been simultaneously shrinking). But considering the rapid price hikes in recent years, it's actually a steal.
[Read the Full Article]

The Prime Rib has been known to DC insiders as the home of the power lunch for more than two decades. There, lawmakers, business tycoons, and other high-rollers work on the deals that shape America. It's a sight that would surprise most everyday Americans. No, it wouldn't be the décor, or the clientele, or the jacket-and-tie requirement that would supply the shock; it would be the menu, which boasts a $25 hamburger.
[Read the Full Article]

As a media spokesperson for the sugar industry, I talk to reporters a lot. And right now, they all seem to want to talk about one thing: sugar prices. Many are confused about the difference between highly volatile world sugar prices, which have ranged from 6 cents to 30 cents per pound in the past five years, and U.S. prices, which tend to remain much steadier.
[Read the Full Article]

Want to know who's really making the money off of rising food prices? Sometimes a picture says it all. Every time commodity prices are on the rise, we start hearing from the major food manufacturers that they are forced to raise their prices because of what is happening on the farm. This was especially true in 2008, when political opponents of ethanol were chiming in to try to convince the public that biofuels were to blame for higher grocery prices.
[Read the Full Article]

For corn, wheat, and rice farmers, the strong prices they saw in 2007 and 2008 are but a distant memory by now. As a consumer, you probably haven't noticed.
[Read the Full Article]

Farmers have always known that they're on the short end of the food dollar. In fact, cultivators of the land only see about 19 cents out of every dollar Americans spend to buy the food they grow. But a stat was thrown out during an August agricultural convention that even made the most grizzled farm veteran take notice.
[Read the Full Article]

PORTALES, N.M.—Recessions usually mean big business for peanut producers as shoppers flock to low-cost, high-protein foods like peanut butter. But a highly publicized salmonella outbreak early this year linked to the Peanut Corporation of America (PCA), combined with a 2008 bumper crop, has left peanut producers and businesses alike in a less than favorable position.
[Read the Full Article]

NEW YORK (June 17, 2009)—Last month, a group of Texas farmers traveled more than 2,000 miles to New York City to meet with urban reporters and talk about the importance of our rural communities. As it turns out, these farmers weren't as far away from home as they might have thought.
[Read the Full Article]

CHICAGO—Recession or not, people will still celebrate Christmas, Halloween, Easter and Valentine's Day, which is why candy companies make money in good times and in bad, says the National Confectioners Association (NCA).
[Read the Full Article]

MINNEAPOLIS—If Kevin Garnett's picture suddenly disappeared from the Wheaties box, most grocery shoppers would notice the absence of the former Timberwolves star. But if the amount of cereal within that box shrank by an ounce or two, few people would even realize it.
[Read the Full Article]





Bookmark and Share



Enter your email address below to receive our newsletter:



Farmer's Share


Copyright © 2009 All Rights Reserved