Agriculture is the engine that powered America's past and will propel us out of today's troubles and into a prosperous tomorrow. And we're not just talking about feeding and clothing the country. American farmers and ranchers fuel our economy and energy future all while preserving the environment.

Healthy eating relies on farmers near and far
It's a refrain heard in kitchens and dining rooms across the land-"You're not getting up from this table until you eat your vegetables." To this day, most of us can still hear the echo of our mothers urging, pleading, ordering us to eat our veggies-and for goodness sake, stop trading your apple for a can of Pringles at lunch!
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The Perfect Storm
As the northeast begins to clean up and assess losses in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, the unpredictability of Mother Nature is again on full display. This severe weather event is just one recent example of the types of uncertainties our farmers face day in and day out, and it serves as a compelling argument for the importance of ensuring that our farmers have the tools they need to succeed in feeding our nation.
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Eggs: Edible... But still incredible?
There was a time when you could enjoy the newspaper over a breakfast of two sunny side eggs, some bacon, and a piece of toast with butter. Today, it's likely that whatever you're reading could ruin your appetite.
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Drought on the farm, but not in U.S. agriculture colleges
A searing drought has zapped the breadbasket of American agriculture in the Midwest, but agricultural colleges are blossoming like never before. Students are flocking to farming courses, driven by the abundance of available jobs in related fields—a reality that is in sharp contrast to the one facing city kids who are finding employment opportunities scarce in a recession-ravaged economy, college officials said.
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As American As Apple Pie
It is one of the oldest symbols of Americana—the apple, apple pie, Johnny Appleseed. And though the United States may no longer be the biggest apple grower in the world—our production has been surpassed by China's—the fruit remains an icon of American life and a vibrant export for fruit farmers. Apples have grown in popularity as a staple health food for people all over the world. Washington State is the biggest producer—claiming nearly 70 percent of the market, with New York, Michigan, Pennsylvania, California and Virginia trailing far behind, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
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A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words
Every once in a while, a weather-related event is so widespread, so devastating, that it has the potential to effect people hundreds of thousands of miles from where it occurred. The current drought that is blanketing the United States has the potential to be such an event.
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Crop Insurance Reduces Pain for Drought-Stricken American farmers
It's the worst drought to hit the United States in a quarter century, and it has hammered farms across the country, turning once-promising corn stands into shriveled husks and hay fields into dust bowls. On July 10, 2012, the U.S. Drought Monitor confirmed that the top 10 corn producing states are experiencing various stages of drought. Nationally, it showed, nearly 80 percent of the contiguous U.S. is experiencing some level of drought, with nearly 40 percent of that considered severe to exceptional.
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American Farmer as Environmentalist - Debunking a Stereotype
Have you ever found yourself in a conversation in which one or more participants discussed the negative impacts of modern agriculture on the environment? We'd be willing to bet the farm you have. But what about the negative impacts that ignoring the environment would have on modern agriculture? And the fact that our farmers and ranchers long ago made the environment a priority and have overseen a 50 percent decline in cropland erosion in just the past 30 years?
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Feeding America's Cities
From Peter Luger under the Williamsburg Bridge in Brooklyn to Alfred's on Merchant Street in San Francisco, many Americans would trifle more with how their T-bone is cooked than where the meat comes from. Americans eat about 97 pounds of meat a year, which comes out to something like almost 2 pounds per week for every person in the country. To a large part, the meat is homegrown, raised in sprawling cattle ranches that are strung out from Texas to Montana.
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On This Day In History...
On this day in 1862, President Abraham Lincoln established the United States Department of Agriculture—or as he referred to it—the "People's Department." Back then, more than 50 percent of Americans lived on the farm. Today, only two percent of the population calls it home, but the People's Department remains and continues to serve the best interest of every American.
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Agvocacy: In Seven Minutes Or Less
What do the Texas Cotton Association, Monsanto and a graduate student have in common? They have all recently released videos educating people about the importance of agriculture and urging them to stand up in support of American farmers and ranchers. First, the Texas Cotton Association—a coalition representing the cotton produced by the many thousands of cotton growers in Texas and Oklahoma—released a short but compelling film about, you guessed it, cotton.
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Crop Insurance 101
Earlier this week, National Crop Insurance Services (NCIS) released the first of what is to be a series of educational videos explaining the importance of crop insurance and its functionality among American agriculture. In this video-aptly titled "Crop Insurance 101," Tom Zacharias, president of NCIS, reviews the history of the program, why it was created, and why Congress should "do no harm" to it in the upcoming Farm Bill.
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Teresa Scanlan says for her, rural America still reigns
Teresa Scanlan is still standing up for U.S. agriculture even after her reign as Miss America has ended. At the 2012 Commodity Classic, held last week in Nashville, Tennessee, the Nebraska-born 19 year old addressed hundreds of the nation's sorghum growers, saying she recognizes there is still a lot more to be done in protecting America's farmers and ranchers, and she doesn't plan to quit anytime soon.
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Association of Equipment Manufacturers Forges Relationship with Farmers
The Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) has announced that it will be playing a bigger role in agricultural advocacy (or, as it's more commonly known, "agvocacy") starting by partnering with The Hand That Feeds U.S. Members of the AEM Ag Sector Board recently met in Chicago to discuss some of the issues facing agriculture and what that means for the manufacturing industry moving forward.
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Crop Insurance's Growing Value
As a former chief economist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture I can attest to the fact that farming is indeed a risky business. News reports out of USDA's Risk Management Agency underscore that point all too clearly: With some 15 percent of all crop insurance claims yet to be processed, crop insurance companies have paid out a record $9.1 billion so far in indemnity payments to America's farmers for 2011 crop losses, surpassing the record set in 2008 by nearly half-a-billion dollars. And the 2011 figure will continue to climb.
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February Follies — the Budget and Agriculture
Agriculture is a unique industry in so many ways. One particular way—it is perhaps the only area of the federal budget to have shrunk in the past 10 years, yielding cuts even as it was coming in under budget. Funding for farm policy over the last five years ('07-'11) averaged $12.9 billion per year. This is a 28% reduction from the '02-'06 average of $17.9 billion and a 31% reduction from the $18.8 billion average from '97-'01.
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2011 Indemnity Payments Already Surpass Historic Record, Still Climbing
With claims still streaming in ?only an estimated 81 percent of expected claims have been finalized ?crop insurance companies have already paid out a record $9.1 billion in indemnity payments to America’s farmers in 2011. This has already surpassed the former record of $8.67 billion in indemnities paid in 2008, according to USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA).
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The Economics of Fortune Telling
Agriculture has had a strong year. We’ve been reading reports of farms prospering for the better part of a year now. In October it was said that Iowa’s corn and soybean crop alone would almost quadruple the state’s budget. Just last month, the USDA announced that farm exports reached a record high of $137.4 billion in 2011.
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Rising Farm Incomes Dampened by Rising Expenses
We’ve been reading reports of farms prospering for the better part of a year now. In October it was said that Iowa’s corn and soybean crop alone would almost quadruple the state’s budget. Just last month, the USDA announced that farm exports reached a record high of $137.4 billion in 2011.
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Thanksgiving: An American Tradition
American history tells us that the first Thanksgiving feast was held by the Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony in 1621 to celebrate the first bountiful harvest in America. More than 200 hundred years later, the tradition had spread throughout the new territory, but was celebrated by individual states in a nation that had since been torn apart by the very war and politics that had once united its people.
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Can Crop Protection Lead to Job Safety?
By now you've read the headlines: Global population reaches seven billion. We've been watching the numbers tick upward for years, but just like that, it's come and gone, and our attention is trained to the next milestone—nine billion.
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Record Farm Exports Also Deliver Opportunities
Farmers and ranchers are increasing productivity, delivering more safe and affordable food than ever, and the rest of the country—and the world—is starting to take notice. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reported earlier this month that farm exports reached a record high of $137.4 billion in FY 2011—exceeding past highs by $22.5 billion—resulting in an agriculture trade surplus of $42.7 billion.
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Soybean Demand Boosts State and National Economies
Promar International, a farm, environment and agri-food consulting firm that specializes in research in the global agricultural and agri-food sectors, released its 2010 Economic Analysis of Animal Agriculture, reporting that in 2010 alone, U.S. animal agriculture contributed...
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Miss America Talks Food, Fuel, and the Future of Farming at NAFB
The National Association of Farm Broadcasters hosted its 68th Annual Conference in Kansas City last week-featuring members of the agricultural community including producers, crop insurers, farm lenders, and seed technology companies. And... Miss America 2011, Teresa Scanlan of Nebraska.
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In Record Drought, Farm Policy Helps Agriculture Get Back to Business
While much of the country has been focused on the national debt, consistent job loss, and a sluggish economy, rural America has been booming, and it has looked as though the agricultural sector was once again in a position to lead us to recovery. But 2011 brought some unexpected weather anomalies, causing farmers and ranchers throughout Texas to shift their attention to the skies where, according to a recent article in the Washington Post, Mother Nature has chosen to unleash her equivalent of the country's spiraling debt crisis.
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Key Scientist Says Agriculture Productivity Growth Must Increase
A leading scientist recently told American millers that U.S. investment in agricultural research is less than 1 percent of the total farm gate value of goods, which must be increased by developing a greater voice for "the science of agriculture" through cross-sector efforts.
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U.S. Agriculture Still Warrants Public Support
There’s no doubt about it: Agriculture is a bright spot in an otherwise dreary economy. While the rest of the nation struggles to stay in the black, agriculture’s net income grew by more than 17 percent last year.
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Large or Small, Farming is a Local Tradition
The Annual National Food Policy Conference is a place to settle differences, establish compromise, and walk off—federal agency hand in federal agency hand—into the sunset. Well, not quite. But it does provide a two-day platform for fair and open discussion about our nation's issues regarding food safety, nutrition, and of course, farming.
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The Next Farm Crisis
When you hear the words "farm crisis," what comes to mind? Today, most of us are so far removed from the farm that we probably wouldn't even know where to begin. Does a farm crisis involve the livestock, the farmers, the food... Us?
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High Time We Learned Our Lesson
If Iowa agriculture were a private company, the Des Moines Register reported, "the $33 billion in expected crop and livestock sales would top the $30 billion that Deere & Co. reported last year; more than quadruple the $9.2 billion in revenues generated by the Principal Financial Group of Des Moines; and exceed by seven times the $4.8 billion annual revenues of Rockwell Collins in Cedar Rapids."
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TRIP: Better rural roads needed
Not everyone knows that the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) traces some of its roots back to 1894 as the National Association of Agricultural Implement and Vehicle Manufacturers, whose mission, in part, was to promote better roads in rural America so agriculture goods could get to market quickly and efficiently.
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Putting the "labor" back in Labor Day
This year's commemoration of the American worker fell a little flat, as it was met with a less than celebratory report—zero new jobs were added in the entire month of August—making this the least productive month in job creation in more than a year.
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The Grapes of Wrath... Part II?
The Texas panhandle has not seen rain since October 17, 2010—making this the state's driest period of time on record. And it's not just the panhandle—with more than 82 percent of the state experiencing "severe or exceptional" drought conditions, Texas' agricultural community has taken a major hit this year.
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Higher Input Costs, Lower Bottom Lines
Critics of farm policy like to reference high commodity prices when making the case for another raid on the farm budget—which has already sustained up to $15 billion in cuts in the past six years. But what good are high commodity prices, if the input costs are rising even higher? Furthermore, what good are high crop prices, if there is no crop to harvest, as was the case in many parts of rural America this year, which were hit with drought, floods, and heavy winds that left the land unproductive.
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Common Ground
"It's a story of affordable food and good nutrition, both here at home, and meeting those needs around the world," a reporter says from a field in Chicago, Illinois, in a video news report about a group attempting to mobilize U.S. citizens in the fight to protect domestic agriculture.
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Miss America, Farm Bill Author, Federal Reserve Offer Pearls of Wisdom
When I first got word that Miss America 2011, Teresa Scanlan, was interested in helping spread agriculture’s good message, I had some reservations. Blinded by stereotypes and generalizations, I figured an 18-year-old pageant winner couldn’t possibly be an effective spokesperson for an industry as serious and established as agriculture.
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Founding Gardeners brings us back to our roots
With America's birthday fast approaching, everyone's busy planning barbecues, block parties, and beach trips. But as is the case with most holidays, we rarely stop to think about what is being celebrated.
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An Unnatural Disaster
Since the beginning of time, man has lived and worked, subject to the whims of Mother Nature. The earliest livelihoods—fishermen, shepherds, and farmers all evolved in order to weather whatever storm came their way, and, for the most part, we have learned how best to deal with nature's wrath.
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CNBC Anchor Delivers Common Sense View of Production Agriculture
Would you be interested in a rousing, common-sense defense of production agriculture made by a well-known cable TV news personality? If so, you might want to read Chapter 8 of "Your Teacher Said What?!" by Joe Kernen and Blake Kernen. They wrote the book after Blake, then nine years old, shared with her parents questionable economic ideas she learned in school.
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Advocacy for Ag: The Next Generation
Miss America 2011 Teresa Scanlan addressed a room full of her peers at an intern luncheon in Washington, DC, yesterday. Teresa-who started working with The Hand That Feeds U.S. just this past April—has already made quite a name for herself in the world of agriculture.
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Useless But Major
As a new class of interns descends upon the nation's capital, there has been a flurry of discussion throughout every office building in the city, which usually starts with the same question: What is your major?
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Rural America's Roller Coaster
Things were going well in rural America. The Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City credited small towns, specifically farming communities, with leading the country’s recession recovery in 2010. Farm household incomes climbed. Agricultural exports reached new records. Buying power from the Heartland trickled out to the coasts. Farm policies came in well under budget.
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Come Rain or Shine, U.S. Farmers Need Protection
Claims that we might see the largest and most profitable harvest in U.S. history are being called into question by a series of weather anomalies that are breaking historic records of their own and inflicting major damage to America's heartland.
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Face of a Giant Agribusiness
According to some, I am a giant agribusiness -- the worst kind of factory farmer. What qualifies me for this dubious distinction? Nothing except that, based on U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) figures, my farm falls in the biggest six percent of U.S. farms. And these farms account for the bulk of federal farm policy support.
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The Cornhusker's Crown
Earlier this month, the nation's capital hosted one of the nation's most iconic representatives, Miss America 2011. Teresa Scanlan, who is the former Miss Nebraska, met with several farming groups including representatives of corn, sugar, wheat, rice, and cotton to learn more about the importance of U.S. agriculture and the men and women who produce our food, fuel and fiber.
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Farms are Necessities
I stumbled on something eye-opening recently while surfing the Internet for ways to address my toddler's weighty question: "Daddy, why are those people sleeping on the street?" His question came while we were driving in DC after a snowstorm, and it presented a unique opportunity to teach a three-year-old about philanthropy and compassion (a lesson that I honestly needed a refresher on after spending years trying not to make eye contact with the homeless faces asking me for help each day).
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Playing Nice in the Capitol's Sandbox
U.S. agriculture is known for being big, bold, and ready to lead. Our farmers and ranchers are the descendents of great Americans who conquered the Wild West, took a chance on a piece of land that might lead to a better life, and served as the backbone of a young country that has grown into the powerful nation that it is today.
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MISS AMERICA TERESA SCANLAN: Why All Americans Have a Stake In the Success of Our Farmers and Ranchers
The spring air is always full of hope back home in Gering, Nebraska. This time of year, farmers plant seeds in hopes for Mother Nature’s cooperation and a successful harvest. Ranchers help birth the next generation of their herds and hope for fair market prices. And workers at the local sugar plant catch their breath after a busy winter and hope for a bumper crop this fall so they can do it all over again.
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Agriculture will drive U.S. recovery
U.S. House Agriculture Committee Chairman Frank Lucas, R-Cheyenne, and retired general and NATO Commander Wesley Clark, a Democrat, have something in common. They see America's farmers and ranchers as a "thin green line" that we must hold.
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Holding the Thin Green Line in San Antonio
It is fitting that farmers from across the country will be in San Antonio this week for the annual National Farmers Union (NFU) convention. Like the historic Battle of the Alamo synonymous with the city, today's agricultural industry could also be described as a few brave souls holding the line.
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'Hold the Thin Green Line' Message is Spreading
It looks like the idea of “holding the thin green line” first referenced by retired Army General Wesley Clark, and echoed by farm leaders, and even an advertising campaign is getting a warm reception by some important lawmakers on Capitol Hill.
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We've Got the Goods
While 2010 may have been the Year of the Golden Tiger, it will never be remembered as the year of the golden dollar. However, as we begin anew and look back on the past year, there is one shining statistic that breathes new life into the American economy.
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The thin green line: The importance of America's farmers
When you hear Wesley Clark preach about the importance of the "thin green line" to America's security, you assume he's talking about soldiers. After all, Clark served as a general in the U.S. Army and was the Supreme Allied Commander of NATO.
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Hold the Thin Green Line
When the United States rationed food during World War II so citizens and soldiers had enough to eat, the Secretary of Agriculture often repeated the slogan: "Food will win the war and write the peace."
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Don't Call it a Comeback: America's Oldest Industry Leads Another Recovery
In the wake of last week's State of the Union address, there has been a lot of talk around the proverbial water cooler regarding the direction in which we, as a nation, are headed.
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The Fed's Promising and Troubling News
The Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City might have well asked, "do you want the good news or the bad news," prior to releasing two recent white papers about the farm economy.
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Who's More Popular, a Farmer or a Trash Man?
A young father of three small children, I spend a fair amount of time on YouTube.com, showing my kids first-hand the video answers to their questions. "What's a hippopotamus, Daddy?" A trip to YouTube is much closer than a trip to the zoo.
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Why Farm Policy Matters
Rural America has felt both alienated and under the gun over the last year and a half and that pressure has been building up, and it came to a full boil on Nov. 2. The temptation to assume a healthy farm economy does not matter to rural residents who are not engaged in farming can be fatal.
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U.S. Farmers Bring Home the Bacon
Earlier this month, Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack announced major victories for both the agricultural and U.S. economies. Farm exports are up. Way up. And according to the USDA, they are predicted to reach $126.5 billion in 2011 alone-an all-time record high.
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A Calm Before the Storm?
A recent Newsweek cover story titled, "Greetings from Recoveryland," mapped out the top 10 U.S. cities that have not only survived the economic recession currently affecting the rest of the country, but are emerging on the other side with a shiny new appeal.
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An Icon Among Many
We're in the midst of the busiest travel season of the year, when people throughout the country make their way home by planes, trains, and automobiles, to spend the holidays with family and friends. If travelers happened to be flying American Airlines during this Thanksgiving holiday, they may have read about another woman who went back to her roots to see, well, its roots.
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A Locally Grown America
While it is often disputed among Americans where exactly the first Thanksgiving took place, we can be certain of one thing: it was in celebration of the harvest. Whether it first occurred in Massachusetts or Virginia, all of the food would have been grown "locally" due to transportation and other logistical constraints of the time.
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David vs. Goliath
Sometimes simple weapons are all you need. David used a slingshot. And, more recently, another David used the truth. The more recent David is a West Texas wheat farmer, David Cleavinger, who took on the high-powered, special interest pedaling, cash-rich CATO Institute in a live TV cable debate over the merits of U.S. farm policy.
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The ABCs of American Agriculture
As Americans, the idea of agriculture is deeply ingrained in our minds at a very early age. Whether we're singing about Old MacDonald's farm-which, if you make it through all the verses, is extremely productive-or listening to a bedtime story about Johnny Appleseed planting orchards throughout the fields of the Midwest we are inundated with a barrage of agricultural references from the moment we enter a classroom.
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Nice Jeans, President Lincoln
Did you know that cotton costs the same today as it did 150 years ago? Think about that statement for a moment... Now try to make a list of products that are still as inexpensive as they were when guys like James Buchanan, Abraham Lincoln, and Andrew Johnson called 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue home.
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Could Higher Crop Prices Actually Help the Economy?
Prices are up across the board for agricultural commodities, and when farmers are asked about it, most have a similar answer: "It's about time." After years of exploding input costs, growers are happy to recoup past losses and make investments to improve efficiencies for the future.
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Wrapping Rural America in Red Tape
As lawmakers crisscross the country campaigning on job creation and economic recovery, one agency in D.C., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), appears to be busy choking rural America's biggest economic engine. Agriculture is an economic success story, with 21 million American jobs rooted in food and fiber production. And it's doing more than keeping people employed—the ripple effect of goods produced and purchased by the farming sector is felt from coast to coast.
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Planting seeds on the Web
Farmers have long been at a disadvantage to well-funded agricultural opponents with millions to spend on slick advertising campaigns. However, in recent years, more and more farmers have begun to turn to free, rapidly growing media tools that have allowed them to advertise their businesses, connect with similar-minded individuals, and promote their causes via various social media platforms. As a result of their efforts, these farmers have formed an informal online community—participants are often referred to as "agvocates"—that has allowed them to finally band together to combat negative media advances as well as exchange ideas and form partnerships.
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Attacks on agriculture don't quite add up
Stephen Budiansky's recent op-ed column in the New York Times, Math Lessons for Locavores has been an eye-opener for proponents of the local food movement who may have been under the impression that more traditional agriculture is an energy hog and therefore bad for the environment.
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Connecting in Rural America
In urban and suburban America, it's easy to take advantage of high-speed Internet access. It's available everywhere: at home, at the office, at the local Starbucks. In fact, we are so spoiled that some of us even get put out when we aren't able to get online on an airplane.
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The Miracle of Corn
"Look at this," he said, showing the room a single kernel of corn. "Plant it in the ground, and before you know it, you'll end up with this," he continued, holding up a full ear of corn. "One kernel becomes 560 kernels. If that's not a miracle, I don't know what is."
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Fact or Fiction?
In today's information age where everybody's got a venue and is pedaling something, it's hard to know when you're dealing with facts, someone's spin, or just plain fiction. With some very powerful and monied interests lined up against U.S. farmers and ranchers, understanding the facts about exactly who produces all of our food and fiber in this country is made all the more difficult.
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Excuse Me Waiter, Make Mine American
America might be embroiled in an economic recession right now, but there are just some things not worth skimping on—like good, homegrown food. Ninety-five percent of Americans said it was important for the United States to produce its own food instead of depending on imports, according to a new survey by Harris Interactive.
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Back to the Farm
Zac Yoder is only 28 years old, but he has the kind of background that would impress any potential employer. He received a college degree in aeronautical science, and his first job out of school was at L3 Communications, a prestigious defense contractor. But, a few years into his new career, Zac decided that working in an office all day wasn't for him. He wanted something more challenging. So Zac returned home to work at his family's farm in Dalhart, Texas.
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Founding Fathers Offer Food for Thought
Each year on the 4th of July, Americans get together with family and friends to celebrate the birth of our nation. Our country's founding fathers probably wouldn't have been able to imagine what America would look like more than 234 years after they signed the Declaration of Independence, but they certainly were right about one thing: the importance of farming to America and its ability to propel our fledgling nation into one of the world's superpowers.
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Defending America's Farmers is a 'Dirty Job,' But Someone Has to Do It
If you watch the show "Dirty Jobs" on Discovery Channel, you know the name Mike Rowe, the host who shadows people doing jobs most folks don't see on a regular basis. What you might not know is the respect he has for the American farmer, as shown in an editorial recently posted on his website.
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Both Sides of Their Mouths
President Obama spent a lot of political capital and will spend a lot of taxpayer money to make sure people can have good health coverage if, heaven forbid, like me, they ever need it," she said. "But there seems to be a level of hypocrisy in the Administration when it comes to other kinds of insurance."
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Starving for a Little Common Sense
When we opened up a recent edition of The New York Times and saw the headline "The Obesity-Hunger Paradox," we got excited. Maybe, we thought, someone was finally tackling the issue of world hunger and how the obesity debate could ironically hinder U.S. farmers' ability to address this problem.
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The Denim Blues
Jeans have come a long way from their humble roots as the tough but affordable work pants made famous by Levi Strauss. It is no longer uncommon to see a pair of jeans selling for $100, $200, or even $300, and the global jeans market is valued at more than $50 billion. To people around the world, jeans represent a symbol of American culture, and many foreigners are willing to save their hard-earned wages for these expensive American imports.
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Down in the Weeds
In the world of unintended consequences, some extreme-minded environmentalists might take the cake. That's because in their quest to revert agriculture to the stone ages, they could actually be starving millions of people.
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Forbes Columnist a Fan of Farms
Although some farmers bemoan the fact that much of the "mainstream media" are not in touch with the realities facing the American agricultural industry, they are also glad to give credit where it's due.
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Attack of the Belgian Endive Part 2
Long before he donned an oversize helmet and climbed aboard an M1 Abrams tank, Michael Dukakis had made a name for himself in rural America.
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TIME for Higher Food Prices
WASHINGTON (September 28, 2009)—The U.S. unemployment rate may have reached a 26-year high of 9.6% last month but that didn't stop TIME magazine from running an article laying out the case for, of all things, raising the price that financially-strapped American consumers pay for their food.
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Finally, A Seat at the Table
The Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry last week named Senator Blanche Lincoln (D-AR) its new chair, making her the first woman in the Committee's history to take the helm.
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TIME Flies: Part 4
Three decades ago, TIME magazine took an in-depth look at ?a href="http://www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,948286,00.html#" target="_blank" class="Article">The New American Farmer? At the time of their feature, the business of farming was rapidly shifting from the inefficient, tiny farms that dominated the 1930s, to larger-scale family run operations that need to be adept at business, engineering, and technology to keep up with the world's growing population.
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TIME Flies: Part 3
In addition to bad hairdos, Woodstock, and butterfly collars, the ?0s also brought with it groundbreaking technologies that propelled many U.S. businesses into a new era. Farming was no exception. But the new technologies that improved efficiency and boosted yields came with a hefty price tag. The cost of farming skyrocketed during the decade, and the low profit margins that have long haunted the profession got even thinner.
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TIME Flies: Part 2
To hear agriculture's opponents tell it, you'd think most farmers are raking in the big bucks. But anyone who's been around the business knows that's never been the case. The margins in farming are as thin today-maybe thinner-as when TIME magazine had this to say in a 1978 cover story "The New American Farmer."
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TIME Flies: Part 1
Nowadays, it's pretty difficult to get a mainstream news organization to pay much attention to the business of farming or the importance of the profession to the country. Big-city reporters today tend to focus on the sensational and the conflicts created by a handful of over-zealous farm opponents.
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Americans Want Their Food Red, White and Blue
U.S. farmers sometimes worry that the American public takes them for granted.
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Ain't we popular?
All of sudden all things "food" are sexy and media worthy, from recalls of tainted peanut products and spinach—and the accompanying rallying cry from Capitol Hill to reinvent food regulation—to the increasingly self-righteous call for all things edible to be local, natural, holistic and pure.
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Domestic Farming Headlines

  • New York Times - Sweet Potatoes Step Out From Under Marshmallows
  • New York Times - The well grounded senator
  • The Fort Morgan Times - USDA does not do enough
  • Washington Times - Environmentalist turns to e-bullying
  • Morris Daily Herald - Consumers still view farmers favorably
  • Los Angeles Times - Farm work should be an honored, palatable job for Americans
  • The Des Moines Register - Vilsack slams media for portrayal of farmers
  • BusinessWeek - U.S. On Track to Double Exports in Five Years, Locke Says
  • Feedstuffs - Senate leaders still unhappy with crop insurance changes
  • Successful Farming - Campaigning for ethanol
  • AgriNews - Farmers adopting precision agriculture techniques
  • AgriMarketing - Study shows loss of atrazine could eliminate 21,000 to 48,000 jobs
  • Stanford University - High-yield agriculture slows pace of global warming, say FSE researchers
  • Farm and Dairy - Stark County couple working to keep farming in the family
  • AgriMarketing - Purdue: Atrazine provides efficient, cost-effective weed control


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